The Organs of St. Paul’s

Organs

THE MANUEL ROSALES ORGAN, OPUS 22

Installed in 1999, the St. Paul’s organ was built by Manuel Rosales of Los Angeles, California. The organ has three manuals (keyboards), 45 stops (totaling 2,677 pipes), and is in a mahogany case designed by John Blatteau of Philadelphia in the Greek Revival style, as is fitting for the historic Greek Revival building.

The organ (pictured above) is dedicated in loving memory of Mr. & Mrs. William E. Massey, Sr. Many other families and individuals also contributed towards this splendid organ.

This was the first large Rosales organ to appear in the eastern half of the U.S. It has tracker (mechanical) key action and electric stop action.

Organ Specifications (PDF)

Photos of the organ

THE HENRY ERBEN ORGAN, ST. PAUL’S CHAPEL

The organ in St. Paul’s Chapel was built in 1837 by eminent New York City organ builder Henry Erben for St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, Granville, Ohio.  Restored by Mann & Trupiano of Brooklyn, N.Y. in 1984 for Church of the Epiphany, Newton, N.C., it was offered for sale again in 1988 and was purchased for St. Paul’s Chapel.  The organ has one manual and 6 stops. The original hand pumping mechanism still functions as an alternative to use of the electric blower. The keyboard compass is 58 notes, GG-f”’ (no GG#). The solid Spanish mahogany case is the only known extant example from Henry Erben; normally pine with faux finish was used at that time.